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Jinx
01-17-2012, 05:58 PM
I swear some things are built primarily to annoy you. Right now I'm sitting in a dark house with no power. This message is being typed using my laptop and sent via my D-Link router that's hooked up to an uninterruptable power supply. I have several of these UPS's throughout the house. The UPS I just mentioned, one on the main computer, and one for the Tivo and TV in the living room.

Now that the power has failed, they are all beeping away, to let me know there is no power. I got that impression when all the lights turned off! Why must they beep so? Is that really something someone thought was a good idea?

ronman
01-17-2012, 06:05 PM
I've had a couple UPSes through the years that got so annoying (because the power fluctuated so frequently) that I opened them up and removed the speakers.

And in my old office, I had everything hooked to a UPS, because the power would dip below 80VAC several times a day. And this wasn't some trailer, it was one of the largest buildings in Gainesville, FL, a fully-modern multistory glass-walled complex built in the late '80s. Anyway, when the power hit, there's nothing quite as annoying as the sound of a 90-UPS chorus... :|

TDSP
01-17-2012, 07:43 PM
Right now I don't have a UPS hooked up in my office, just a capacitor board/closed circuit because I pulled everything for maintenance and found problems :| My generator can't show up soon enough!

I wanna bludgeon the engineer who designed the interface on my blu-ray player. It's like trying to shuffle cards with mittens on to watch Hulu.

Also, want to stabby stabby stabby the asshole at apple who decided pentalobe screws were a good deterrent to keep out hackers. Same with the fuckface at dell who designed their HDD caddies from 2005-2008. Same with the vietnamese prostitute that Toshiba pulled off the street who decided to add "safety fasteners" to all of their commercial networking and phone equipment :DINORAGE::DINORAGE::DINORAGE::DINORAGE::DINORAGE: :DINORAGE:

Matt Booker
01-17-2012, 10:13 PM
Something I always hated about PC equipment was when the manufacturer would use cheap screws. If the screw is in too tight, the phillips indents sometimes break and you've got to use pliers to remove the screw.

And it often seemed to happen on the tiny ones uses for laptops. :argh:

Guess that's another reason I'm glad I don't work in IT anymore.

~Matt Booker

lynchingacers
01-22-2012, 02:56 AM
electronics do dumber things when put in cars i dont know why...

Jinx
01-22-2012, 03:59 AM
electronics do dumber things when put in cars i dont know why...
This is what concerns me about new cars today. Technology isn't current for more than a few years tops. What will Ford Sync be like in a car when the car is 10 to 20 years old?

cowman
01-22-2012, 04:02 AM
Unless USB/bluetooth and current standards go away, it will probably work just fine. Ford did make it upgradable(you can download new versions of the software online and install in the car with a USB memory stick) so anything they can do in software will be updated.

If not people will probably swap it out for aftermarket stuff.

ronman
01-22-2012, 05:35 AM
The problem there is that manufacturers keep doing shit like putting the AC controls in the nav screen, so you can't upgrade.

cowman
01-22-2012, 05:51 AM
That's true. Even if you don't have the nav screens, the panels are now so elaborate that you still need to buy a $300+ adapter in some cases to swap in an aftermarket unit.

What we need is some standardized form factors and interface protocols. Maybe the next gen car radio can be a box behind the dash somewhere and you get a panel with controls/display that just plugs into whatever box you install. All of it using standard connectors and whatnot..

Not saying that any of the car makers would actually DO that but it would be nice.

TDSP
01-22-2012, 06:16 AM
Oh, I had a good one yesterday.

I had a brand new UPS with clips so tight that it let me plug in to it, but then when I went to unplug it, the fucker wouldn't let go. So, I ended up getting my knife and going on the OUTSIDE of one of the prongs to pry, thinking "Oh, this is safe enough, this won't... *CRACK*" Nice new melt in the edge of my knife :|

lynchingacers
01-22-2012, 06:27 AM
Oh, I had a good one yesterday.

I had a brand new UPS with clips so tight that it let me plug in to it, but then when I went to unplug it, the fucker wouldn't let go. So, I ended up getting my knife and going on the OUTSIDE of one of the prongs to pry, thinking "Oh, this is safe enough, this won't... *CRACK*" Nice new melt in the edge of my knife :|
didint unplug it first?


honestly all this gps and Bluetooth ecu integration and black box crap they put in every car is a bit worrying in one sense
you're gonna say something "AGAINST THE PARTY" in you're car there going to shut it off lock the doors and make it like a episode of BAIT CAR
that and i am wondering really how secure all this sync and other car computer software is

although if you can download updates it would be interesting to see if Linux or something similar can be setup on it lol

cowman
01-22-2012, 07:42 AM
I don't know much about the other systems but sync is basically a small box behind the dash that is linked to the car's radio/steering wheel controls. You can disable it by pulling a fuse or unplugging it pretty easily. As far as communicating data, it requires a paired phone right now to do that. If you get directions, look for restaurants, get weather, or anything else that requires it to go get data it dials a 1-800 number on your phone. At that point your "voice command" is really just a call with a 1-800 service. I assume nav data is being exchanged by something similar to an old dial-up modem.

Jinx
01-22-2012, 08:34 AM
I really doubt Ford will support the software in it's cars for more than a couple years after a car has been released. They'll use it as an excuse to force you to upgrade. "Sorry, your car can't do that. Only this year's model is compatible."

Apple's marketing is based on this. For example, if you want Siri, you need the newest model phone. Don't forget that when Siri was in beta, it worked perfectly on the older 3GS and 4G iPhones. When the new phone came out, too bad. The old phones suddenly couldn't run Siri anymore.

Actually, I think car manufacturers want to model themselves after the cell phone market. They don't want people using their product 10 years after the car was built. Android phones for example, are usually supported for about 18 months after their initial release. You get OS updates until this point. After that you are SOL. The cell providers and manufacturers want you to upgrade. My original Motorola Droid never did get past Android 2.2.1 even though it should have been capable of running 2.3.4. Motorola just stopped supporting it after 18 months. I wanted the newer Android OS and was forced to replace the phone.

I have no doubt car manufacturers would love this model. Right now most cars last 10 years before they are scrapped. I think the car companies would love to see a 2-3 year life cycle. They could be taking a cue from the phone market and making their cars obsolete in a much shorter time period.

The only solution I see to this is that Ford open sources Sync (and whatever the other car companies have) and let hobbyists make custom firmware to get a little more life out of the computer systems on these cars.

lynchingacers
01-22-2012, 08:41 AM
if all else fails just upgrade to a nice standard dash with an aftermarket head unit and a car pc ...

Matt Booker
01-22-2012, 06:17 PM
Oh, I had a good one yesterday.

I had a brand new UPS with clips so tight that it let me plug in to it, but then when I went to unplug it, the fucker wouldn't let go. So, I ended up getting my knife and going on the OUTSIDE of one of the prongs to pry, thinking "Oh, this is safe enough, this won't... *CRACK*" Nice new melt in the edge of my knife :|

You should post a picture of it. It looked pretty wicked.

~Matt Booker

cowman
01-22-2012, 07:16 PM
I really doubt Ford will support the software in it's cars for more than a couple years after a car has been released. They'll use it as an excuse to force you to upgrade. "Sorry, your car can't do that. Only this year's model is compatible."

Apple's marketing is based on this. For example, if you want Siri, you need the newest model phone. Don't forget that when Siri was in beta, it worked perfectly on the older 3GS and 4G iPhones. When the new phone came out, too bad. The old phones suddenly couldn't run Siri anymore.

Actually, I think car manufacturers want to model themselves after the cell phone market. They don't want people using their product 10 years after the car was built. Android phones for example, are usually supported for about 18 months after their initial release. You get OS updates until this point. After that you are SOL. The cell providers and manufacturers want you to upgrade. My original Motorola Droid never did get past Android 2.2.1 even though it should have been capable of running 2.3.4. Motorola just stopped supporting it after 18 months. I wanted the newer Android OS and was forced to replace the phone.

I have no doubt car manufacturers would love this model. Right now most cars last 10 years before they are scrapped. I think the car companies would love to see a 2-3 year life cycle. They could be taking a cue from the phone market and making their cars obsolete in a much shorter time period.

The only solution I see to this is that Ford open sources Sync (and whatever the other car companies have) and let hobbyists make custom firmware to get a little more life out of the computer systems on these cars.

I think you're right that Ford won't be releasing updates for software 5-10 years down the line. However, the phone - car interface is a pretty standard bluetooth protocol. Music is either a standard bluetooth protocol or iphone/standard USB stick type protocols. Applink(the thing that lets you do stuff like pandora) is a standard interface. If the developers for the phones/phone apps already have the standard communications library they will probably retain that feature for the next version of their device/software.

Sync will still work as it did when you got it... just don't expect the next great thing to be supported.


But, thinking ahead further... Sync is just a module behind the dash with connections to the radio/steering wheel controls/etc. I wonder if some company will seize on this at some point in the future and just make a replacement module for sync that leaves all the dash stuff as-is.

TDSP
01-22-2012, 09:10 PM
didint unplug it first?

Unplugged it, but didn't pull the battery. I was seriously shocked *boooooom CLANG!* that a knife blade 4 cm away was THAT attractive of a ground path.


You should post a picture of it. It looked pretty wicked.

~Matt Booker

I will when I go to sharpen it :look:

unixdude
01-23-2012, 03:04 AM
I really doubt Ford will support the software in it's cars for more than a couple years after a car has been released. They'll use it as an excuse to force you to upgrade. "Sorry, your car can't do that. Only this year's model is compatible."

Apple's marketing is based on this. For example, if you want Siri, you need the newest model phone. Don't forget that when Siri was in beta, it worked perfectly on the older 3GS and 4G iPhones. When the new phone came out, too bad. The old phones suddenly couldn't run Siri anymore.

Actually, I think car manufacturers want to model themselves after the cell phone market. They don't want people using their product 10 years after the car was built. Android phones for example, are usually supported for about 18 months after their initial release. You get OS updates until this point. After that you are SOL. The cell providers and manufacturers want you to upgrade. My original Motorola Droid never did get past Android 2.2.1 even though it should have been capable of running 2.3.4. Motorola just stopped supporting it after 18 months. I wanted the newer Android OS and was forced to replace the phone.

I have no doubt car manufacturers would love this model. Right now most cars last 10 years before they are scrapped. I think the car companies would love to see a 2-3 year life cycle. They could be taking a cue from the phone market and making their cars obsolete in a much shorter time period.

The only solution I see to this is that Ford open sources Sync (and whatever the other car companies have) and let hobbyists make custom firmware to get a little more life out of the computer systems on these cars.

Seriously, do you really want any software written by M$ in your car? Hell no! Why can't one of the UNIX or UNIX-like OS step up and provide something better.

Just wait until the script-kiddies learn how to crack into Sync and think of what kind of fun they'll have. Hopefully M$ will actually implement more challenging security so the script-kiddie will have to be at least double-digit age to crack.

Jinx
02-03-2012, 04:42 AM
I hate the modern day blinking cursor.

There was a time when a blinking cursor meant a window was in focus and ready for input. On more than a few occasions I will open a browser, see the blinking cursor in the Google search box and start typing. After I input my question, I look back at the search box only to find nothing has been input and the cursor is still happily blinking in the empty search box. THE BLINKING CURSOR IS A LIE! The cursor should ONLY be there if the window is in focus and ready for input! When did they change this and who is responsible?